The Age of Genius

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  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • The Age of Genius
  • A.C. Grayling
  • 12 November 2018
  • 1620403447

About the Author: A.C. Grayling

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Age of Genius book, this is one of the most wanted A.C. Grayling author readers around the world.


The Age of Genius The Age of Genius explores the eventful intertwining of outward event and inner intellectual life to tell, in all its richness and depth, the story of the 17th century in Europe It was a time of creativity unparalleled in history before or since, from science to the arts, from philosophy to politics Acclaimed philosopher and historian A.C Grayling points to three primary factors that led to the rise of vernacular popular languages in philosophy, theology, science, and literature the rise of the individual as a general and not merely an aristocratic type and the invention and application of instruments and measurement in the study of the natural world.Grayling vividly reconstructs this unprecedented era and breathes new life into the major figures of the seventeenth century intelligentsia who span literature, music, science, art, and philosophy Shakespeare, Monteverdi, Galileo, Rembrandt, Locke, Newton, Descartes, Vermeer, Hobbes, Milton, and Cervantes, among many During this century, a fundamentally new way of perceiving the world emerged as reason rose to prominence over tradition, and the rights of the individual took center stage in philosophy and politics, a paradigmatic shift that would define Western thought for centuries to come. Read The Age of Genius Author A.C. Grayling – scottishhomebakingawards.co.uk

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10 thoughts on “The Age of Genius

  1. BookBrowse says:

    Building a book length argument around his contention that the seventeenth century is the moment when one world view was displaced by another because the scientific displaced that of faith, Grayling paints a picture of astronomers, mathematicians, medical doctors, and even alchemists often reaching conclusions that even they dearly hoped weren t true because the answers meant opposing Christian doctrine, unwise if you wanted to keep your job, freedom or headTo my e...

  2. Bertrand says:

    Disclaimer I found this book in my local tube station I picked it up knowing only of Grayling as one of the apostles of new atheism, and thus expected an arrogant panegyric to the self evident progress of rational mankind, couched under the guise of a sweepingly broad brush popular history It turned out to be somewhat less arrogant than expected, but not quite as sweeping as I would have liked All in all, I started prejudiced, but was quite pleased with the book The book endeavours to descr Disclaimer I found this book in my local tube station I picked it up knowing only of Grayling as one of the apostles of new atheism, and thus expected an arrogant panegyric to the self evident progress of rational mankind, couched under the guise of a sweepingly broad brush popular history It turned out to be somewhat less arrogant than expected, but not quite as sweeping as I would have liked All in all, I started prejudiced, but was quite pleased with the book The book endeavours to describe the seventeenth century as a whole, which the author claims to be the turning point in human history He of course falls short of such an encyclopedic project, but does so in style The book is divided in three sections, the first examining the politics...

  3. Gary says:

    To understand who we are one must first understand where we came from and how we got there Nothing providesinsight into our current human condition than a well thought out history about a critical century of thought such as this book provides I ve noticed that my Scientific American during the last two issues has commented on how the two statements recently made by actual politicians Climate change is a Chinese Hoax , and that philosophers are not as important as welders , show a co To understand who we are one must first understand where we came from and how we got there Nothing providesinsight into our current human condition than a well thought out history about a critical century of thought such as this book provides I ve noticed that my Scientific American during the last two issues has commented on how the two statements recently made by actual politicians Climate change is a Chinese Hoax , and that philosophers are not as important as welders , show a complete detachment from reality Critical reasoning and rational thought based on empirical facts are universally accepted by subscribers to Scientific American and they owe a debt a gratitude to the 17th century pre Enlightenment age as outlined in this book.The book provides a very good narrative for describing how we went from magic to science in such a short time He ll bring in the elements from the 16th century which are necessary for telling the story and takes the story into the 18th and beyond when require...

  4. Peter Thomason says:

    This is a book that deserves to be studied, annotated, digested, and referenced, not just read Grayling is an excellent and unpretentious writer and a master at distilling important and complex issues in intellectual and cultural history for amateurs like me and I suspect for those who areadvanced also The first section on the Thirty Years War 1618 1648 was hard to get through but a necessary backdrop for what follows as it puts the whole century in context and perspective He make This is a book that deserves to be studied, annotated, digested, and referenced, not just read Grayling is an excellent and unpretentious writer and a master at distilling important and complex issues in intellectual and cultural history for amateurs like me and I suspect for those who areadvanced also The first section on the Thirty Years War 1618 1648 was hard to get through but a necessary backdrop for what follows as it puts the whole century in context and perspective He makes a solid argument for the 17th century being the epoch in human history that brought us the modern mind out of, and due to, the political and social chaos and upheaval wrought by the wars that plagued 98 of its 100 years His belief is that it was the turmoil itself that opened the way for an unprecedented exchange of ideas resulting in the development of scientific method and progress on one hand and republican democracy on ...

  5. Dee says:

    This book is basically the non fiction backstory to Neal Stephenson s Baroque Cycle starting with Quicksilver Except the Baroque Cycle manages to cover a lotof the world But this was up front about its restrictions of location and scope it was going to cover Western Europe in the 17th century and the changes that society underwent.And it does it hard It s a solid both sturdy and dense history book It s often somewhat opaque not assisted by the author s fondness for somewhat old This book is basically the non fiction backstory to Neal Stephenson s Baroque Cycle starting with Quicksilver Except the Bar...

  6. Jo Walton says:

    A thorough and interesting account of both the political and intellectual developments of the seventeenth century, focused on Europe but aware of the whole planet The last chapter surprised me by turning into an impassioned plea for civilization, but hey, I m for civilization too.

  7. Garnett says:

    Seemingly over ambitious attempt to tie together pretty much everything that happened in the 17th century I learned quite a bit, skipped over some sections, and enjoyed much of the writing.

  8. Yip Jung Hon says:

    This is not a bad book It is a well informed, scholastic piece that chronicles the early 17th century But it s over ambitious by trying to summarise the whole enlightenment era into a 300 page book The book starts with the wars of the 17th century The reader is briefed about the relevance of war towards the advancement of science But the first part goes too far to detail the exact treaties, edicts, battles, and generals It feels like I m reading a book about the 30 years war instead Was d This is not a bad bo...

  9. Keen says:

    In the seventeenth century Galileo, Newton and others laid the basis of modern science, Descartes and Spinoza altered the history of philosophy, Hugo Grotius founded international law, and Hobbes and Locke set the terms of modern political theory Unless you happened to be part of the royal family or the elite clergy, living in the 1600s was certainly no picnic Witch trials, witch burning and outbreaks of the plague were just some of the horrors lying in wait throughout most of Europe All of In the seventeenth century Galileo, Newton and others laid the basis of modern science, Descartes and Spinoza altered the history of philosophy, Hugo Grotius founded international law, and Hobbes and Locke set the terms of modern political theory Unless you happened to be part of the royal family or the elite clergy, living in the 1600s was certainly no picnic Witch trials, witch burning and outbreaks of the plague were just some of the horrors lying in wait throughout most of Europe All of this before we get to the horrendous Thirty Year War 1618 1648 , which eventually ended in the Treaty of Westphalia Overall, estimated deaths from the conflict...

  10. Stephen Coates says:

    At the beginning of the seventeenth century, science was embryonic, the Holy Roman Empire controlled much of continental Europe, the Netherlands was controlled by Spain and Galileo was tried by the Inquisition and forced to retract his support for the Copernican model of the solar system to save his life By the end of the century, their were scientific institutes or ...